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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:25 am
Posts: 24
Location: Washington State
My captain has Beleives that our leggings should not be worn on dress parade or dress occasions. Could anyone help with this? I've looked in my books for any instance of the matter and haven't turned anything up. I would imagine that they would be due to the fact that they were and "issue" item.


Last edited by Ethan Whitehall on Mon Jul 02, 2012 4:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 8:48 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:33 pm
Posts: 252
Location: Old Northwest (Michigan)
Ethan,

A spirited debate can be found on the Authentic Campaigner website: (http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/for ... Cal-Kinzer) with regards to a wide range of opinions about how to look 'authentic'.

As leggins being part of dress uniform--yes they were. But since they were issued on only one occassion (Caspar Trepp's Quartermaster report for Dec 1861 show 98 leggings, 98 knapsacks, 98 hats and 98 greatcoats (Seamless Clothing grey felt 'waterproofs'); among other issuances. But this does not translate that every man would have had them present for the March 1863 review. Granted, Brian White's research on "Painted Tent" images of USSS of that time frame (March-April; possibly May-June 1st) show a few men still posing for photos wearing the leggings; but others do not.

I believe the larger issue here is: Do I follow orders from my company commander? We are part of a 'reenacting' Army. Like the original volunteers our officers and NCO's are elected to those positions for a variety of reasons. During the CW, in private life they were likely distinguished citizens of the community; some already having been elected to positions of the public trust (mayor, sherriff, etc.). Recruiting for companies were no different--these men were offered commissions if they could bring enough qualified (?) men to serve in the army. Those that did so, recieved commissions that reflected their recruiting success (Col-1000 men) and ability to network/politic with other men (Capt=100 men) to form a regiment.

I have had the opportunity to serve under some truly inspiring leaders and some where I looked behind their tent to find the Cracker Jack box their bars came out of. Despite the differences, I try to do my small part in 'honoring the memory of the original men' by following orders and doing my duty. The Minnesota Sharpshooter muster out rolls for esteemed veterans had a simple epithet: (He was) "A brave and good soldier". There can be no higher compliment to aspire to.

Bill Skillman
Hudson Squad, USSS


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:25 am
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Location: Washington State
Thank you again Bill. My Capt. and I have been in contact with eachother and have been talking about the matter. He and I came to an agreement with the whole matter. He and I are good friends and always love to test each others skill or knowledge with Sharpshooter info. Its a good reason to come here and spend 7+ hours pouring over all the threads here.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 9:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:33 pm
Posts: 252
Location: Old Northwest (Michigan)
Ethan,

You can thank Dave Rider for being such a gracious host to allow guests like me to post information that I have gathered on the Sharpshooters on this forum.

I am glad that you and your C.O. have found a common ground of agreement. There are issues to 'die for' and those that it is more important to stand back and think about the needs of the company. FYI, I may have served with your C.O. if he was one of the fellows who flew east in 2002 to participate in Recon 2 at Cedar Creek, VA. I recall 2 fellows from Oregon who came out. Unfortunately, the event was cancelled less than 24 hours in due to rain and plunging temps on Saturday eve (that threatened hypothermia); so we never had a chance to 'stand down' and sit around the campfire tto swap 'old soldier tales'. So many years have passed I don't recall their names and I didn't write them down in my journal.

Being the Orderly Sgt. your job is to be the 'go between' the officers and enlisted men, it is one of the most important roles in reenacting (let alone the original Sharpshooters). Good luck on growing your company.

Bill Skillman
Hudson Squad, USSS


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 1:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:25 am
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Location: Washington State
I believe that would be Captain Sturgill, he was the one that got our unit up and running. He has since last year been the only member in our Washington or Oregon club to do a Veteran reserve Corps impression. Captain Brown is our new C.O. We are all pretty young guys in our company, our youngest rifleman is 14 and our oldest being 60. I think our average age though is 20-22, me and my captain are in that age range. However we are known as the war dogs in our brigade, if you want a company captured, a position held, cannons taken or a hard and fast flanking maneuver... You got 2nd USSS Co. D right on the job. Dont mean to brag about us just some info on what we have become since 2005 when our unit was started.

Thanks again,

Ethan


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